lsauto.html

Winter 1999

Earl Jackson, Jr.

tomrip5@aol.com

Lauren Silvers


intel-auto-bio-lectual and such

Subj: intel-auto-bio-lectual
and such


Date: 2/2/99 6:31:43 PM Pacific
Standard Time


From: Lauren Silvers

To: Earl
Jackson, Jr
.


tomrip5@aol.com
ok-i just can’t say ‚i
love‘
without reasons, so this is going to sound


like an awards speech.

[not in order]
i love: proust
because his text and i are incestuously involved at any and


every moment. and because i laughed–a LOT, on practically
every one of


those 3295 pages.


:kristeva
because i had always loved her and never known who
she was
or


what she wrote until 1996, and i love her neurotic lyricism.


:murakami
because everything is always left deliberately, (slyly)


unfinished, so that it
all breeds
like chiggers
under your skin


:julian
barnes
for HISTORY OF THE WORLD IN 10 1/2 CHAPTERS, a sentimental


fave for providing me with the stuff of [controlled]
insanity and


presumption when i was eighteen and alone, wandering
italian trains, and


reading about woodworms (out loud to dissuade COMPULSIVE
PERSONABILITY).


:nabakov
for ADA OR ARDOR…
:a.b.
yehoshua
because he is such an amazing writer
that normalcy and


yuppiness become good things to
write about when you read him


:mario vargas llosa for ,
derek


walcott,rob.frost&wal.stevens,
kafka, james
ellroy,
zola for ,


federico garcia lorca, vicente
huidobro for , italo calvino,


roland
barthes,
dostoievsky,
phillip k. dick
, and freud
(for the uncanny)…
and i think it is unfair but necessary to simply LIST
writers i don’t like:


paul
auster
, kundera, j.l. austin, t.s. eliot, henry miller, kerouac and


the rest, a.s. byatt, pynchon…

 


LITERATURE because it has always
been my route to abandon. nothing can be


more
alien to my parents
. i
am
obsessed with words. i am obsessed with


meaninglessness.
i am obsessed with meaning. i pay for college by my


self. it was my idea to go to college
to study literature. i love


focusing and doting and above all
eliciting strand-like ideas that almost


cannot make sense outside the scope
of literary
criticism. it is always


rewarding.

MY FAVORITE TEXT would have to be
Gluck’s.
Is that


cheating? I’ve read it before,
and it is one of the most complex,


synesthetic,
and provocative texts i have ever read. After I finished it,


I simply had to allow all of its
layers to marinate
inside
me for a while.


I still haven’t said
one word aloud
about it to anyone, although i have


thought about it considerably.
So i am immensely grateful to read it a


second time, this time with an
intention beyond a silent internalizing of


the sensuality of its words and
images.



TO LOCATE THE KINDS OF QUESTIONS
ASKED IN CLASS THAT INSPIRE ME THE MOST


is

a difficult thing to do.

Of course I love provocative
questions
, and I


really enjoy when all of us in
the seminar interact and enlighten each


other with our complementary &/or
disparate views. So I lament for the


blocks of silence
that
sometimes weigh on our seminar. Earl,
your


questions are always provocative,
and it just occurred to me that perhaps


our silence has a bit to do with
our patchy backgrounds in pre- and early-modern


studies,
as


well as the foreign-ness
of the texts themselves. Perhaps we are all


thinking and assimilating; perhaps
we should start thinking
and


assimilating
out loud
more often. I especially enjoy the semiological


approach to the classic texts;
I think it is an extremely relevant and


productive method of analysis for
a mode of thought that, while
alien
to


me, seems to me to have an analogical
and referential basis. And I think


the sokal
debate
is integral to our
project
as a seminar.
I hope we can


talk more about how he uses theoretical
rhetoric, or how he


hyper-rhetoricizes it in an attempt
to render it fallible (which to me has


affinities with Plato’s qualms
about the Sophists).


Lauren
Silvers

To
Lexica

To
Syllabus


Copyright 1998-1999

Earl
Jackson, Jr
.


tomrip5@aol.com

Another
Scene
Cyberpedagogy