Films and Filmmakers Moving Hieroglyphs

Moving
Hieroglyphs


a film series

Tuesdays 7PM

January 8- March 12, 2002

Classroom
Unit One


UCSC
Campus


curated by Earl
Jackson, Jr.


talkingcure2000@aol.com

free and open to the public

 

 

The Films
Information
on the Filmmakers
1/8/02

The Thief
of Bagdad


(Raoul
Walsh 1924
)
This film stars Douglas
Fairbanks, Sr
. at the height of his powers. He wrote the script under
a pen name and gave William Cameron Menzies a freehand to create one of
the most spectacular film-fantasy worlds to date. It cost $2 million [quite
a lot at that time] and the critics loved it. Features Anna May Wong 
as an „evil“ Mongolian slave. Menzies also designed Fairbanks‘ crypt, known
as his „last set“ on the grounds of the Hollywood
Forever Cemetary
.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 



1/15/02 

The Tiger of Eschnapur

(
Fritz
Lang
1958)


**Nota Bene:
This is Part One of a two-part Film. 


Part Two, The
Indian Tomb
, will be screened at 7PM, 


Thursday, January 17, in Media Theater 110.
Fritz
Lang Filmography
Early in his career, Lang was called in to work on the
script of the film The Indian Tomb with Thea
von Harbou
, based on Harbou’s novel. The two subsequently married and
collaborated until he fled the Nazi’s in 1932 and von Harbou divorced him
and joined the Nazi party. Lang had a long career in Hollywood. In the
1950s a German film company begged Lang to make a film in Germany. He agreed
on the condition that he could direct a remake of The Indian Tomb,
and that this time it would be shot on location in Indian. They agreed.
The film is a full-color extravaganza, in two feature-length episodes:
The
Tiger of Eschnapur
and The Indian Tomb. The two-part feature
was never released in the U.S., but a horribly patched together  90-minute
mix of the two, dubbed into English was released as Journey to the Lost
City.
The  full film is presented here as Lang intended it. Very 
little has been written on it as it has been unavailable for so long.
The
Films of Fritz Lang – by Michael Grost 


Thomas Elsasser. Fritz
Lang: The Illusion of Mastery


German
Exoticism Film A Symposium on Exoticism in German Silent Film


1/22/02

Scorpio
Rising 


(Kenneth
Anger
1963)2[29 minutes]


The Great Silence (Sergio
Corbucci
1968)
f Scorpio Rising exemplifies what I mean by „moving
hieroglyph“ – a keenly edited critical phantasy in which a very specific
image repetoire generates a constellation of a psychosexual microcosm and
its communicative interface with the culture at large. Sadomasochistically
inflected biker-dreams permutate through old movies of Christ’s passion
on a cheap portable TV. Gorgeous, enchanting and invigorating.


Sergio
Corbucci is  a dark poet of the Spaghetti Western, known in particular
for Django (1966). The Great Silence
was
never released in the United States
. It stars Klaus Kinski, Jean-Louis
Trintignant and, in her debuting role, blaxploitation star Vonetta McGee.
Gorgeously photographed in the Pyranees, this is the story of a band of
outlaws-of-conscience in Utah, hunted by „bounty-killers“ and a mute mercenary
(his throat having been cut as a child so he couldn’t  tell the authorities
that the sheriff had murdered his parents) who is called in to defend them.
This is a rare film and a quirky vision that bears watching. It is shown
with an English-language dialogue track since all the principle actors
spoke English in the film, with the exception of Trintignant, who would
have spoken French, had he not been cast as the mute.
See „Spaghetti
Westerns
“ which does not mention this film, unfortunately, and gets
Corbucci’s name wrong as director of Django (1966).

Kenneth Anger born in California
in 1930. Appeared in the 1934 production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream
as the changeling prince. Is considered along with Jack Smith, Andy Warhol,
Jonas Mekas,
Marie
Mencken
, Ron Rice, Bruce Connor, Stan Brakhage, Ken Jacobs, et alia
one of the mainstays of the American Underground
Cinema:
.

 1947   Fireworks  14 min. 

 1949   Puce Moment  6 min. 

 1953   Eaux d’Artifice (Italy)
13 min. 


 1954-56 Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome
41 min


 1963   Scorpio Rising  30
min. 


 1964   Kustom Kar Kommandos 
3 min.


 1966   Lucifer Rising (central
footage stolen) 


 1969   Invocation of My Demon Brother 

 1973   Lucifer Rising, Part 1 
25 min. 


 1980   Lucifer Rising  45
min. 

Kenneth
Anger interview


Underground
Cinema: the 1960s


kenneth
anger: a. dossier


Magick
Lantern Cycle


1/29/02

Rose
Hobart


(Joseph
Cornell
1936) [16 minutes]


The Legend of the Suram Fortress

(Sergei
Parazhanov
1983)
Joseph Cornell (1903-1972)
lived a quiet life on Utopia Parkway in Flushing  New York with his
mother and his brother Robert. A wool retailer, he began making
art-construction
boxes
in the early 1930s, and was first exhibited in 1932. Particularly
influenced by Max
Ernst
and Marcel
Duchamps
. He also made compilation film collages of found
footage
. One such work is Rose
Hobart
(1936), made from reedited portions of the 1931 film, East
of Borneo
.  When screened at  MOMA in 1936, Salvador
Dali
kicked the projector over enraged
and accused
Cornell of stealing his dreams. Cornell was assisted in
making other films by a young Stan
Brakhage
, who would later on become a major figure in Underground Cinema.


Joseph
Cornell Boxes
. at the Web Museum.


A PBS
feature on Cornell in Real Audio
.
Sergei
Paradjanov
(1924-1990). Armenian born and
raised in Georgia. Studied at the Soviet All-Union State School for Film
Art and Cinematography. Studied with Alexander Dovzhenko and Igor Savchenko
in the Kiev Cinema Studios. Most Important Films:

Shadows of Our Forgotten Ancestors (1964). Of the
Hutkul minority population in the Ukraine. Shot in the Hutkul dialect of
Ukranian.

Sayat Nova (1969). On the Armenian poet Aruthin
Sayadin (1712 – 1795), Recut by Sergei Yutkevich as The Color of Pomengrantes.[In
Armenian]

The Legend of Suram Fortress(1985) [In Georgian]

Ashik Kerib (1988) [In Georgian
and Azeri]

Sergei
Parajanov – Interview
 


Sergei
Paradjanov
 


 Click THIS
for the first Online
Armenian-Russian dictionary for Business
.


Click THIS
for a fascinating overview of the grammar of the Georgian language.


Click THIS
for a pdf-file essay on the Morphology
of the Georgian Aorist
tense.


 
2/05/02

Salt for Svanetia

(Mikheil
Kalatozishvili
1929)



Man
of Aran


(Robert
Flaherty
1934)
Salt
for Svanetia
is a breath-takingly beautiful, poetic enactment of
the Soviet effort to build roads into the mountain isolation of the Ushkul,
a minority population in Siberia who were in crisis because of the lack
of salt.


Man of Aran is an equally poetic portrait of the
dizzying struggle to survive of a small Irish community who essentially
live on a barren rock in the middle of a particularly treacherous stretch
of the North Sea.


Mikheil
Kalatozishvili 


Georgian director often known by
his Russianified name, Mikheil Kalatoshov. Most Important Films:

Salt for Svanetia (1930)

The Cranes Are Flying (1957)

I am Cuba (1964)

The Red Tent (1971)

 

 

History
in Images/History in Words

Historical
Cinematography

Robert Flaherty (1884-1951)

 Mineralogist  and mining engineer who started
making films of „real  life“ almost by accident. Nanook of the North
(1922), a portrait of an Inouit family was a surprise hit. In referring
to the film, John Greyson coined the term „documentary.“ Other films include:


Moana (1926): White Shadows on the South Seas
(1928); Man of Aran (1934); The Land (1942); Louisiana
Story
(1948).
Robert J. Flaherty –
Web Resources 


The links below are made available through the courtesy
of the Web
Archive in Visual Anthropology
, at Temple University.


http://nimbus.ocis.temple.edu/~jruby/wava

Books

Robert
J. Flaherty, a Biography
by Paul Rotha. Edited by Jay Ruby.
Philadelphia:
University of Pennsylvania Press, 1983. Made available by the kind permission
of Gei Zantzinger, copyright holder.
** See Chapter
Three
on Man of Aran.
Articles

Robert
Joseph Flaherty – An Appreciation (1998) by Dennis Doros

Robert
J. Flaherty, „Life Among the Eskimos,“ World’s Work, October 1922,
pages 632-640.

Robert
J. Flaherty, „How I Filmed ‚Nanook of the North‘,“ World’s Work,
October 1922, pages 632-640.Robert J. Flaherty, „How I Filmed ‚Nanook of
the North‘,“ World’s Work, October 1922, pages 632-640.

Robert
E. Sherwood, „Nanook of the North,“ in The Best Moving Pictures of 1922-23,
Boston: Small, Maynard & Company, 1923, pages 3-8.

Robert
J. Flaherty, „Picture Making in the South Seas,“ Film Yearbook 1924,
pages 9-13.

Robert
J. Flaherty, „The Handling of Motion Picture Film Under Various Climatic
Conditions,“ Transactions of Society of Motion Picture Engineers,
No. 26, meeting of May 3-6, 1926, pages 85-93.

Frances
Hubbard Flaherty, The Odyssey of a Film-Maker, Beta Phi Mu Chapbook,
Number Four, 1960, pages 9-18.


 

2/12/02

La Ricotta

(Pier
Paolo Pasolini
1962) [20 mins.]


Cleo from 5 to 7

(Agnes
Varda
1963)
La Ricotta is a short film
starring Orson Welles directing a film about Christ’s passion. The irony/tragedy
focuses on the actor playing one of the thieves crucified with Christ.

Cleo from 5 to 7 is exactly that: a study of two
hours in the life of a young French pop singer who is waiting for results
from a medical exam, and facing a possible cancer diagnosis.


Agnes
Varda
has been making films since 1956 and is an important member of
the French
Nouvelle Vague
. Equally at home with fictional narratives and documentary,
some films mix the two such as Lion’s Love.


Agnes
Varda Interview
ooo Pier
Paolo Pasolini
is among the most significant filmmakers and theoreticians
of film in the latter half of the twentieth century. He was also a poet,
a painter, an anthologist of Friulian poetry, and a leftist-philosopher.
He was murdered probably by the police.


Pasolini
Net
. A wonderful, rich Site dedicated to the work of Pasolini.


A
Pasolini Site in Friulian
!


A
Filmography with Annotations
.


List
of Published Works
.
2/19/02

Nostalghia

(Andrei
Tarkovsky
1983)
Andrei
Tarkovsky’s
Nostalghia
is an exquisitely filmed
meditation. A  Russian poet in Italy to research the life of an exiled
Russian artist. The poet meets a local mystic in Siena which acts as a
catalyst for the poet to face the nature of his own longing.
, Nostalghia.com
– An Andrei Tarkovsky Information Site

Andrei
Tarkovsky

Central
Europe Review – Tarkovsky: The Long Take That Kills

The
Passion According to Andrei: Andrei Rublev

2/26/02

Kustom Kar Kommandos 

(Kenneth Anger, 1961) [3 minutes]


Pierrot le Fou

(Jean-Luc
Godard
1965)
See My Re:
Godard
Clearing house of sources in my Cinema
and Subjectivity
site. And the two links below.


For the discussion of Pierrot
le Fou
I may make it a mini dog-and-pony
show
.
Jean
Luc Godard cinéaste écrivain
 

 Cinema
and Capitalism

3/05/02

Muriel

(Alain
Resnais
1963). I see this film as a third in
a triptych:


Night and Fog (1955); Hiroshima, Mon Amour
(1959) being the first two parts.Night and Fog concerns the Holocaust.
Hiroshima,
Mon Amour
concerns the dropping of the bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Muriel,
I believe, concerns French atrocities committed in Algeria. The text of
Night
and Fog
was written by Jean Cayrol (a Holocaust survivor) who also
narrates the film. Cayrol also wrote the screenplay of  Muriel.
Muriel
stars the incomparable 
Delphine Seyrig as a
woman who sells antique furniture from her own apartment where she lives
with her ex-husband’s son Bernard, a photographer recently returned from
his stint in the army and duty in Algeria. At times the editing technique
in this film is Resnais at his most fervent. Notice that Muriel
made it into
Jean-Luc
Godard’s Top Ten List for 1963
. Click THIS
for the full list and lists from other years too.
Alain
Resnais is one  of the seminal filmmakers of the Nouvelle
Vague
(New Wave). After doing a number of often experimental
documentaries
, he began to make feature-length fictional narrative
films that are obsessed with the relation of time to memory. Among most
important films are:


Night and Fog

Hiroshima, Mon Amour

Muriel

Last Year at Marienbad

The War is Over

Stavisky

Providence

Mon Oncle d’amerique.
Alain
Resnais  Filmography
.
3/12/02

Joan of Arc of Mongolia

(Ulrike
Ottinger
1988)


Joan of Arc  of Mongolia  is a lavish
film of multiculturalism for real. The first half takes place on the Trans-siberian
railway, where all the characters communicate perfectly although each speaks
hhis/her own language (French,
German,
Russian,
and Yiddish,
Mongolian,
and some Mandarin).
The singing Kalinka sisters trio is worth the whole film, except that there’s
riches galore here. the second half of the film follows the groups adventures
living with the Mongolian nomads who kidnapped them from the train. The
film features Delphine Seyrig in her final screen
appearance. Irm Hermann, a regular member of the Fassbinder
group
, is luminous.
Ulrike Ottinger  is an independent
filmmaker, painter, photographer, and theater artist based in Berlin. Among
her films are: 


Madame X: Eine Absolute Herrscherin

Bildnis einer Trinkerin (aka Ticket of No Return)

Freak Orlando

Ottinger maintains her own web site, which is the
best source for information on her work.


Ulrike
Ottinger’s Web Site
.
Back to the Main page for

Moving
Hieroglyphs


a film series

Tuesdays 7PM

January 8- March 12, 2002

Classroom
Unit One


UCSC
Campus


curated by Earl
Jackson, Jr.


talkingcure2000@aol.com

free and open to the public
To the
Web Site for
Rorschach
Test
Patterns
To Moving
Hieroglyphs


To 
Another Scene
.

Earl
Jackson, Jr.


talkingcure2000@aol.com

http://www.anotherscene.com/