Lexica of Desire in the Phaedrus


Nor is there any difficulty about epithumia
(desire), for this name was evidently given to the power that goes (iousa)
into the soul (thumos). And thumos has its name from the raging (thusis)
and boiling of the soul. The name himeros (longing) was given to the stream
(rhous) which most draws the soul;[420a]
for because it flows with a rush (hiemenos) and with a desire for things
and thus draws the soul on through the impulse of its flowing, all this
power gives it the name of himeros. And the word pothos (yearning) signifies
that it pertains not to that which is present, but to that which is elsewhere
(allothi pou) or absent, and therefore the same feeling which is called
himeros when its object is present, is called pothos when it is absen

[420b] but is introduced through the
eyes; for this reason it was in ancient times called esros, from esrein–for
we used to employ omicron instead of omega–but now it is called erôs
through the change of omicron to omega. Well, what more is there that you
want to examine?t. And erôs (love) is so called because it flows
in (esrei) from without, and this flowing is not inherent in him who has
it,19e] Nor is there any difficulty about epithumia (desire), for this
name was evidently given to the power that goes (iousa) into the soul (thumos).
And thumos has its name from the raging (thusis) and boiling of the soul.
The name himeros (longing) was given to the stream (rhous) which most draws
the soul;
[420a] for because it flows with
a rush (hiemenos) and with a desire for things and thus draws the soul
on through the impulse of its flowing, all this power gives it the name
of himeros. And the word pothos (yearning) signifies that it pertains not
to that which is present, but to that which is elsewhere (allothi pou)
or absent, and therefore the same feeling which is called himeros when
its object is present, is called pothos when it is absent. And erôs
(love) is so called because it flows in (esrei) from without, and this
flowing is not inherent in him who has it,
[420b]
but is introduced through the eyes; for this reason it was in ancient times
called esros, from esrein–for we used to employ omicron instead of omega–but
now it is called erôs through the change of omicron to omega